Back To Top
Menu

Sociology (BA), 4-Year

Student with a sociology professo

D'Youville's Sociology major prepares students to understand the relationships between individuals and social institutions in order to develop solutions to social problems.

Overview & Distinctions

Overview

Studying sociology opens up the doors to many careers, including positions in government, public policy, criminal justice, social activism, social work, marketing, or education. D'Youville's Sociology major prepares students to understand the relationships between individuals and social institutions, in order to develop solutions to social problems.

Our program places a strong emphasis on developing clearly defined professional skills. As a student, you'll learn to conduct in-depth interviews, focus groups and data and trend analysis. Upon graduation, you'll be ready to start a career or continue your education in sociology or applied areas such as law, public policy, urban planning, market research, and journalism.

Program Distinctions

Applied Urban Case Study

Juniors and seniors have the unique opportunity to take part in an intense micro-study of problems in a city's urban core. You'll travel with your class to that city to take part in a focused service-learning project.

Individualized Attention

You'll benefit from small classes taught by accomplished faculty, not teaching assistants. And if you're not sure about your career path, our professors will help you explore the possibilities and advise you on courses to take and internships.

Professional Internship

By the time you reach your senior year, you'll be ready to apply what you've learned to an internship in your field of interest. You'll benefit by building your resume while gaining perspective on a future career.

Why Choose D'Youville?

  • Strong interdisciplinary and liberal arts coursework provides an excellent basis for graduate study. Add a minor to further strengthen your background.
  • Deepen your knowledge and cultural understanding through study abroad at a foreign university.
  • Our extensive internship program will allow you to apply what you've learned and gain the kind of real-world experience employers look for through actual on-the-job experience as an intern.
  • D'Youville's long commitment to a liberal education means that you'll receive the kind of interdisciplinary education that will give you a rock-solid foundation. Gain skills like problem solving, critical thinking, collaboration, and written, visual, and oral communication — all skills that employers believe are critical to success, no matter what career path you decide to take.

Automatic Merit-Based Scholarship Consideration

When you apply for admission at D’Youville, we’ll automatically consider you for our merit scholarships. Undergraduate scholarships can cover as much as 50% of your tuition, and there is no need to fill out a separate application!

Transfer students can qualify for scholarships, as well. And unlike other schools, maintaining your scholarship is easier at D'Youville because we use a realistic 2.25 GPA requirement to determine your eligibility for merit-based scholarships each year. 

Check out the chart below to see if you qualify:
Scholarships GPA Scholarship Amount
President's 88+ $14,000
Founder's 83 - 87.9 $12,000
Dean's 80 - 82.9 $10,000
Transfer 3.5+ $5,500
Transfer 3.25 - 3.49 $5,000
Transfer 3.0 - 3.24 $4,500
Transfer 2.75 - 2.99 $4,000

Find more information and additional scholarships on our scholarships page.

View All Scholarships

Admission Requirements

Admission Requirements

At D'Youville, we are committed to selecting students who are academically well-rounded and committed to meeting the challenges of a high-quality education. If you have been successful in a traditional college preparatory program in high school, you should be well-prepared for the academic challenges at D'Youville. While we don't require you to submit ACT or SAT test scores, if you have taken or intend to take a standardized test we encourage you to submit your scores if you'd like them to be evaluated as part of your application.

First Time in College Freshman Requirements:

  • Submitted application for admission
  • Official high school transcripts
    • An overall weighted GPA of 80 with successful completion of high school graduation requirements and three years of math, history, english, and science.

Not Required (utilized in a holistic review for admission if provided):

  • Standardized SAT/ACT test scores
  • Admissions essay
  • Letters of recommendation

Transfer Admission Required Review Criteria:

  • Submitted application for admission
    • Applications are free of charge and can be found on our apply webpage.
  • Official transcripts from ALL previously attended colleges/universities
  • Cumulative GPA of 2.33

 Not Required (utilized in a holistic review for admission if provided):

  • Coursework relevant to major of interest
  • Admissions essay
  • Letters of recommendation

Curriculum

Curriculum

Sociology
Degree: B.A.

Course Requirements for the Major:

In the specific areas of concentration:

Course Number Course Name Credits
SOC 101

Principles of Sociology

The course introduces students to the "sociological imagination," as C. Wright Mills described it. The enduring value of a sociological imagination is to help students situate peoples' lives and important events in broader social contexts by understanding how political, economic, and cultural forces organize social life. Sociology explores minute aspects of social life (microsociology) as well as global social processes and structures (macrosociology). Topics covered vary from semester to semester, but may include socialization, suburbanization and housing, culture, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class stratification, deviance and crime, economic and global inequality, families and intimate relationships, education, religion, and globalization. Additionally, students will use the sociological perspective and gain the ability to distinguish between facts, values, and opinions. Counts as a required course in the Nuts and Bolts Course Cluster for all Sociology majors.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
SOC 201

Social Problems

This course is designed as a critical introduction to major social problems. Students learn to think critically about the ways in which social problems are constructed and to recognize the linkages between the experiences of individuals (personal troubles) and the broad social forces that shape them (public issues). Particular attention is given to social problems related to inequality and privilege, deviance, broken social institutions, and global concerns. Potential solutions are considered from both individual and policy perspectives. Counts as a course in the Stratification and Inequality, Activism and Social Justice, and Law, the Person, and Society Course Clusters.
Offered in: Fall and Spring
Prerequisites: None

3.0
SOC 202

Media and Society

This course offers a sociological perspective on the relationship between the media and society. Media narratives and imagery affect public perceptions of social phenomena as diverse as gender, crime, family relationships, disability, wealth, race/ethnicity, politics, and popular culture. As such, it is important to understand how those narratives and imagery are shaped by the structure of the media industry, including media concentration, inequality of access, and the proliferation of media platforms including the emergence of new media. Counts as a course in the Media, the Person, and Society Course Cluster.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
SOC 301

Deviance and Society

This course is an introduction to the social scientific study of deviance. Students will be exposed to a wide range of perspectives and substantive topics intended to aid in defining, understanding, and explaining social deviance. Deviant behaviors, beliefs, and conditions all have social origins, are learned and made manifest in social interaction, and produce profound consequences for individuals and society at large. Counts as a course in the Law, the Person, and Society Course Cluster.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: SOC-201

3.0
SOC 302

Gender

This course is an exploration of the concept of gender, and how gendered forms of meaning making are shaped culturally, internalized and enacted. Attention is also placed on challenges and alternatives to conventional gender prescription, the confluence of gender and power, sexism and homophobia, and the meanings of gender in various religious, ethnic/racial, class, and age groups. Counts as a course in the Stratification and Inequality Course Cluster.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: SOC-204

3.0
SOC 403

American Labor Movement

This course explores how American people built this nation through individual, family, communal and political action, from the rise of industrial capitalism in the late nineteenth century, to the present day. As students engage with each other in extensive weekly discussions, analyze the textbook, watch video clips, and research and write their term paper, they are encouraged to reflect on how their own life has been influenced by the efforts of previous generations to make a good life and a decent society. While the course will focus on how people worked, and what their workplaces were like, it will also focus on how political movements, business innovations and government policies shaped workplaces and created the rules by which we live and work today. Counts as a course in the Work, the Person, and Society Course Cluster.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: SOC-206

3.0
SOC 404

Collective Action

The purpose of the course is to understand the sources, development and consequences of social and political collectiveness on contemporary social life. To do so, the course will examine current theory and research on social movements, political protest, and other acts of collective resistance. Counts as a course in the Activism and Social Justice Course Cluster.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: SOC-201

3.0
Total  0
Sociology Course Clusters: Choose four courses each from two clusters below (24 credits)

Medical Sociology

Course Number Course Name Credits
SOC 222

Health, Illness and Society

This course explores the broad area of sociological inquiry known as the sociology of medicine. This is a critical survey and analysis of theory and research on health institutions in modern society as well as social etiology of disease, sociological components in treatment, hospital organization and medical practice and sociology of medical education. Students examine the relationship between health, illness and the social factors that may affect wellness. In addition to applying theories and models of society to issues of health and illness, students examine how health care is organized and delivered in the USA and in other capitalist, socialist and emerging societies. Counts as a course in the Medical Sociology and Social Institutions Course Cluster.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
SOC 309

Soc of Disability & Rehabilitation

The course introduces students to the many levels of social consequences that disability can confer upon an individual. The effects of disability (personal, interpersonal and cultural) have significant implications for persons with disabilities, rehabilitation workers and the rehabilitation system. This course will analyze the effects of disability within a sociology framework. Counts as a course in the Medical Sociology Course Cluster.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: SOC-207

3.0
SOC 313

Health Disparities

This course will explore how factors such as person's socioeconomic status, place, race, and ethnicity affect health; how these characteristics play out in case studies; the financial and ethical implications of health disparities on society as a whole; effective strategies for limiting health disparities; and how our own local community members are utilizing these strategies to promote positive change. Additionally, the course will examine relevant historical issues, theories, and empirical data, emphasizing critical analysis and application of knowledge. Students will gain a better understanding of research on health disparities and interventions to promote health equity through a combination of readings, lectures, reflection papers, in-class exercises, and research assignments. Students will summarize the evidence regarding a specific health disparity (topic and population of their choice) and develop an intervention proposal to promote health equity. Counts as a course in the Medical Sociology and Stratification and Inequality Course Cluster.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: SOC-207

3.0
SOC 316

Social Policy for Better Health

With focuses on the social, legal, and political contexts in which health care systems exist and adapt, this course is designed to give students experience creating social policies that address real-life health care issues. And because policymaking involves collaboration and engagement, students will work together on projects to address an existing health issue as identified by the Centers for Disease Control's Prevention Status Reports, employing tactics such as influencing policy and legislation, changing organizational practices, fostering coalitions and networks, educating providers, promoting community education, and strengthening individual knowledge and skills. Class-wide efforts culminate in group presentations and a comprehensive policy brief. Counts as a course in the Medical Sociology Course Cluster.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
SOC 400

Social Epidemiology

This course focuses on social epidemiology, the social factors determining the occurrence and distribution of disease, health defects, disability, and death among groups. The interdisciplinary nature of epidemiological theory, statistical measures commonly used, approaches to modifying and developing health behaviors, health and employment, and an analysis of the distribution of health care in the United States are studied. Counts as a course in the Medical Sociology Course Cluster.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: SOC-207

3.0
SOC 405

Drugs and Society

This survey course examines the nature of substance use and abuse in U.S. society and their implications for social policy. Attention is given to both licit (e.g., caffeine, nicotine, alcohol) and illicit drugs (e.g., cocaine, opioids). Students explore the history and contemporary social landscape of substance use, the social construction of "good" and "bad" drugs, the reciprocal effects of drug use patterns and drug use policy, and the disproportionate effects of U.S. drug policy on the lives of marginalized populations, particularly people of color and poor communities. Counts as a course in the Medical Sociology and Law, the Person, and Society Course Cluster.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: SOC-207

3.0
PHI 301

Knowledge and Reality

The first part of this course explores important philosophical questions about the nature of reality: Is causation only a kind of regularity? Is everything in nature physical? Do selves exist or are they just an illusion? In the second part of the course, we will consider various problems surrounding the nature and possibility of knowledge: Is knowledge best understood as justified true belief? Can we acquire knowledge about the world if we are just brains in vats? And is self-knowledge possible? We will also investigate the cognitive and motivational forces that sometimes cause us to believe and act irrationally.
Offered in: As Needed
Prerequisites: None

3.0
PHI 306

Social & Political Philosophy

This course is a study of social and political theories in their relation to philosophical problems;the nature of the social and political institutions and obligations, the basis of knowledge of social and political obligations,the grounds for sound social and political decisions.

Prerequisites: PHI-201 or RS-201

3.0
SOC 412

Topics in Medical Sociology

This course is an in-depth consideration of topics in the field of medical sociology. Counts as a course in the Medical Sociology Course Cluster
Offered in: As Needed
Prerequisites: SOC-207

3.0

Stratification and Inequality

Course Number Course Name Credits
SOC 201

Social Problems

This course is designed as a critical introduction to major social problems. Students learn to think critically about the ways in which social problems are constructed and to recognize the linkages between the experiences of individuals (personal troubles) and the broad social forces that shape them (public issues). Particular attention is given to social problems related to inequality and privilege, deviance, broken social institutions, and global concerns. Potential solutions are considered from both individual and policy perspectives. Counts as a course in the Stratification and Inequality, Activism and Social Justice, and Law, the Person, and Society Course Clusters.
Offered in: Fall and Spring
Prerequisites: None

3.0
SOC 204

Social Stratification

This course examines the nature, causes, and consequences of social stratification in the United States, with attention given to the distribution of wealth, power, prestige, and other resources in U.S. society. Students examine the implications of the ideology of the American Dream and explore how structural inequalities based on social class, race/ethnicity, and gender impact the life chances and experiences of individuals. Counts as a course in the Stratification and Inequality and Social Institutions Course Clusters.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: SOC-101

3.0
SOC 302

Gender

This course is an exploration of the concept of gender, and how gendered forms of meaning making are shaped culturally, internalized and enacted. Attention is also placed on challenges and alternatives to conventional gender prescription, the confluence of gender and power, sexism and homophobia, and the meanings of gender in various religious, ethnic/racial, class, and age groups. Counts as a course in the Stratification and Inequality Course Cluster.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: SOC-204

3.0
SOC 305

Race and Ethnicity

Race and ethnicity are socially constructed concepts with immense power to influence the opportunities and outcomes experienced in U.S. society. This course examines the nature of race and ethnicity in the United States, including the historical, social, and cultural forces contributing to the contemporary racial/ethnic landscape. Students will explore the causes and consequences of societal conflicts over racism, immigration, identity, and racial/ethnic inequities in education, housing, employment, and other institutions. Counts as a course in the Stratification and Inequality Course Cluster.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: SOC-204

3.0
SOC 313

Health Disparities

This course will explore how factors such as person's socioeconomic status, place, race, and ethnicity affect health; how these characteristics play out in case studies; the financial and ethical implications of health disparities on society as a whole; effective strategies for limiting health disparities; and how our own local community members are utilizing these strategies to promote positive change. Additionally, the course will examine relevant historical issues, theories, and empirical data, emphasizing critical analysis and application of knowledge. Students will gain a better understanding of research on health disparities and interventions to promote health equity through a combination of readings, lectures, reflection papers, in-class exercises, and research assignments. Students will summarize the evidence regarding a specific health disparity (topic and population of their choice) and develop an intervention proposal to promote health equity. Counts as a course in the Medical Sociology and Stratification and Inequality Course Cluster.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: SOC-207

3.0
SOC 406

Global Issues

This course introduces students to a sociological perspective on social phenomena that transcend national boundaries. Students explore issues relating to global development, warfare/terrorism, immigration, and emergent environmental crises including resource depletion, biodiversity loss, and climate change. Particular attention is given to how these global issues are intertwined. Counts as a course in the Stratification and Inequality and Activism and Social Justice Course Clusters.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: SOC-204

3.0
PSC 201

American Government & Economics

This course is a study of the American political and economic systems including the theories underlying them, political parties, pressure groups, the money system, the credit system and the relations between government and the economy. This course meets the core requirements in political science/economics.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
PHI 306

Social & Political Philosophy

This course is a study of social and political theories in their relation to philosophical problems;the nature of the social and political institutions and obligations, the basis of knowledge of social and political obligations,the grounds for sound social and political decisions.

Prerequisites: PHI-201 or RS-201

3.0
SOC 414

Topics in Stratification and Inequality

This course is an in-depth consideration of topics related to the psychology of law. Counts as a course in the Stratification and Inequality Course Cluster
Offered in: As Needed
Prerequisites: SOC-201

3.0

Activism and Social Justice

Course Number Course Name Credits
SOC 201

Social Problems

This course is designed as a critical introduction to major social problems. Students learn to think critically about the ways in which social problems are constructed and to recognize the linkages between the experiences of individuals (personal troubles) and the broad social forces that shape them (public issues). Particular attention is given to social problems related to inequality and privilege, deviance, broken social institutions, and global concerns. Potential solutions are considered from both individual and policy perspectives. Counts as a course in the Stratification and Inequality, Activism and Social Justice, and Law, the Person, and Society Course Clusters.
Offered in: Fall and Spring
Prerequisites: None

3.0
SOC 211

Social Change

This course is designed to help make sense of a rapidly changing world of increasing global interdependence, violence, expanding knowledge and telecommunications, changing values, clashes between religious and secular agendas, transforming family relations and shifting patterns of social inequalities. Competing explanations of social change will be identified and discussed. Special focus is placed on how major social trends influence individuals, intergroup relations and various organizations such as family, work, and community. Counts as a course in the Activism and Social Justice Course Cluster.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: SOC-201

3.0
SOC 315

Social Inquiry and Activism

With a strong focus on social justice, this course prepares students to be responsible citizens in a participatory democracy by (1) challenging them to think critically about the reality claims in contemporary public discourse and (2) providing an in-depth introduction to social activism. Students conduct critical analyses of media narratives about a current event of their choice and engage in supervised activism projects designed in consultation with the instructor. Counts as a course in the Activism and Social Justice Course Cluster.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: SOC-201

3.0
SOC 342

Sociology of Human Rights

This course is designed as an investigation of human rights concerns in contemporary society, including five dimensions of human rights: civil, political, economic, social, and cultural rights. Students explore how the concept of human rights has evolved in U.S. and international law. Attention is paid to major controversies related to human rights abuses experienced by women, men and children in both the United States and a global context. Counts as a course in the Activism and Social Justice Course Cluster.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: SOC-201

3.0
SOC 404

Collective Action

The purpose of the course is to understand the sources, development and consequences of social and political collectiveness on contemporary social life. To do so, the course will examine current theory and research on social movements, political protest, and other acts of collective resistance. Counts as a course in the Activism and Social Justice Course Cluster.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: SOC-201

3.0
SOC 406

Global Issues

This course introduces students to a sociological perspective on social phenomena that transcend national boundaries. Students explore issues relating to global development, warfare/terrorism, immigration, and emergent environmental crises including resource depletion, biodiversity loss, and climate change. Particular attention is given to how these global issues are intertwined. Counts as a course in the Stratification and Inequality and Activism and Social Justice Course Clusters.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: SOC-204

3.0
FA 236

Writing for Social Justice

This course explores writing as a powerful tool for community activism and political action. Students will read, discuss, and write a variety of genres explicitly connected to social and political progressivism, including: personal narratives, letters to the editor, op-ed columns, videos, debate arguments, interviews, blogs, Twitter feed, Facebook pages, online petitions, interactive media projects, etc. The course will also explore the role of DIY art, film, and performance, digital activism, and social media as vehicles of participatory social and political action. Assignments will be designed to foster both expressive and critical thinking and writing skills, problem-solving, the ability to research, organize, and synthesize material, and to generate writing that will deeply explore and interrogate social and political systems, particularly those that produce and perpetuate injustices.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
PSC 349

Political Activism

This is a course that gives students a combination of academic knowledge and practical experience in the electoral process, utilizing fieldwork,guided reading and seminar discussion.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
SOC 409

Topics in Activism and Social Justice

This course is an in-depth consideration of topics related to activism and social justice. Counts as a course in the Activism and Social Justice Course Cluster
Offered in: As Needed
Prerequisites: SOC-201

3.0

Activism and Social Justice

Course Number Course Name Credits
SOC 204

Social Stratification

This course examines the nature, causes, and consequences of social stratification in the United States, with attention given to the distribution of wealth, power, prestige, and other resources in U.S. society. Students examine the implications of the ideology of the American Dream and explore how structural inequalities based on social class, race/ethnicity, and gender impact the life chances and experiences of individuals. Counts as a course in the Stratification and Inequality and Social Institutions Course Clusters.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: SOC-101

3.0
SOC 222

Health, Illness and Society

This course explores the broad area of sociological inquiry known as the sociology of medicine. This is a critical survey and analysis of theory and research on health institutions in modern society as well as social etiology of disease, sociological components in treatment, hospital organization and medical practice and sociology of medical education. Students examine the relationship between health, illness and the social factors that may affect wellness. In addition to applying theories and models of society to issues of health and illness, students examine how health care is organized and delivered in the USA and in other capitalist, socialist and emerging societies. Counts as a course in the Medical Sociology and Social Institutions Course Cluster.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
SOC 311

Families

This course emphasizes the changes in contemporary families, composition of families, expectations of family members, current policies impacting families, and family as a political issue. Consideration is also given to the myths and stereotypes of family life. Counts as a course in the Social Institutions Course Cluster.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: SOC-101

3.0
SOC 312

Sociology of Sports and Phys Activity

This course will investigate the institution of sports from a sociological perspective as it relates to contemporary American organized sports. The perspective taken is that sport is a social entity and thus serves as a microcosm of society and a window through which to view sociological processes. This course will investigate how social phenomenon such as stratification, discrimination, violence, race, and gender are evident in amateur and professional athletics. We will also examine how sports relate to sociological conceptions of community. This course is intended to help you develop a better understanding of how sports are related to broader sociological processes in society. Contemporary American sports are given central focus. Using a variety of readings and online discussions surrounding sports, students will explore the positive and negative consequences, societal risks, and ethical issues related to sports in society. In the process, students will develop a critical approach towards the study of sports. Other topics addressed by this course include the study of sports and socialization, intercollegiate and interscholastic sports, violence and more generally deviance in relation to sports. Counts as a course in the Social Institutions Course Cluster.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: SOC-101

3.0
SOC 417

Sociology of Education

This course examines the structure and process of education in contemporary society. The primary focus is on U.S. public education. Topics include the contribution of sociology to understanding education and teaching; the relationship of education to other institutions such as the family, government, religion, and the economy; demographic changes that affect education; the effect of social class on student achievement and teaching; formal and informal positions, roles and processes in schools; and consideration of current issues such as school funding, compensatory and special education programs, race and gender issues, and educational reform movements. Attention is also paid to the experience of students who come from culturally diverse backgrounds, and to immigrant and refugee youth. The possibilities of public schools are investigated throughout this course, as is the potential for reform using critical pedagogy and equitable policy initiatives. Counts as a course in the Social Institutions Course Cluster.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: SOC-101

3.0
SOC 490

Who Rules the World?

This course examines the historical and contemporary processes by which political power is distributed in society, including the means by which power is gained, lost, inherited and abused. Attention will be given to how categories of people are systematically denied access to power (e.g. voter suppression and felon disenfranchisement), and how they take it back (e.g., social movements and revolutions). Counts as a course in the Social Institutions Course Cluster.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: SOC-101

3.0
FA 331

Media and Culture

Technologies from the invention of writing to the inception of social media have influenced politics, journalism, andculltural production. As they explore aesthetic strategies and techniques in various media, students will engage with the material through both scholarship and practice. Selected readings from scholars, artists, and media activists will provide background and analysis of the history, theory, politics, and methods of participatory media. Students will critically analyze the relationships between media, audience, information, and power and consider the relationship between a participatory democracy and alternative media sources. Students will investigate the politics of representation and will learn to identify bias and manipulation and to recognize and analyze visual and textual systems of cultural codes at work in mass media. In their own projects, they will make use of this knowledge to create their own media messages to work most effectively within the visual and cultural codes they are challenging.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
RS 102

Belief & Unbelief in the Brave New World

This introductory course in the phenomenon of religious faith examines the classic examples of the case for and against living in faith,with the view of enabling students to evaluate their own attitudes toward religion. Faith traditions of Western and Eastern cultures provide additional data for this evaluation.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
SOC 413

Topics in Social Institutions

This course is an in-depth consideration of topics related to various social institutions. Counts as a course in the Social Institutions Course Cluster
Offered in: As Needed
Prerequisites: SOC-204

3.0

Law, the Person, Society

Course Number Course Name Credits
SOC 201

Social Problems

This course is designed as a critical introduction to major social problems. Students learn to think critically about the ways in which social problems are constructed and to recognize the linkages between the experiences of individuals (personal troubles) and the broad social forces that shape them (public issues). Particular attention is given to social problems related to inequality and privilege, deviance, broken social institutions, and global concerns. Potential solutions are considered from both individual and policy perspectives. Counts as a course in the Stratification and Inequality, Activism and Social Justice, and Law, the Person, and Society Course Clusters.
Offered in: Fall and Spring
Prerequisites: None

3.0
PSY 206

Abnormal Psychology

This course scientifically describes and discusses the forms of abnormal behavior guided by the current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM). Specific focus is placed on assessment and diagnosis, etiological factors, treatment possibilities, and predictions of recovery. Counts as a course in the Behavioral and Mental Health Course Cluster.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
SOC 301

Deviance and Society

This course is an introduction to the social scientific study of deviance. Students will be exposed to a wide range of perspectives and substantive topics intended to aid in defining, understanding, and explaining social deviance. Deviant behaviors, beliefs, and conditions all have social origins, are learned and made manifest in social interaction, and produce profound consequences for individuals and society at large. Counts as a course in the Law, the Person, and Society Course Cluster.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: SOC-201

3.0
PSY 365

Psychology and the Legal System

While the fields of law and psychology have historically been independent fields with varying objectives and values, in contemporary times the two have intersected in very important ways. This course will address how psychologists, clinically or empirically, have come to play an important role in the legal system. Major topics including the history and contemporary process of evaluating people for insanity, competency, and civil commitment, psychology's contribution to criminal investigative procedures, jury composition and decision-making, eyewitness testimony, and juvenile delinquency and family legal matters (divorce, custody) will be explored. Counts as a course in the Law, the Person, and Society Course Cluster.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
SOC 405

Drugs and Society

This survey course examines the nature of substance use and abuse in U.S. society and their implications for social policy. Attention is given to both licit (e.g., caffeine, nicotine, alcohol) and illicit drugs (e.g., cocaine, opioids). Students explore the history and contemporary social landscape of substance use, the social construction of "good" and "bad" drugs, the reciprocal effects of drug use patterns and drug use policy, and the disproportionate effects of U.S. drug policy on the lives of marginalized populations, particularly people of color and poor communities. Counts as a course in the Medical Sociology and Law, the Person, and Society Course Cluster.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: SOC-207

3.0
PSY 413

Criminal Behavior

This course will explore the major theories and corresponding research to account from criminal behavior. Attention to how biological, psychological and sociocultural influences play in the origin and exhibition of criminal behavior and aggression/violence will be addressed. The role that biopsychosocial factors play in crimes including assault and murder, sexual assault and abuse, juvenile delinquency, mass violence including serial killers and terrorism, and "white collar" criminal behavior will be discussed. Counts as a course in the Law, the Person, and Society Course Cluster.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
HIS 330

History of Constitutional Law

This course will develop an understanding of the legal system of the United States through the study constitutional history and the U.S. court system.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
PHI/SOC

Choose one elective from PHI 204 or SOC 415

3

Media, the Person, and Society

Course Number Course Name Credits
PSY 205

Social Psychology

This course explores how people behave, think and feel in social situations. Students will be exposed to research methods, and historical and contemporary research findings and theories that have shaped the field. Major topics to be studied will include social perceptions and judgments about others, stereotyping, prejudice, discrimination, conformity and obedience, attraction to others, aggressive and helping behavior, and groups and leadership. Counts as a course in the Media, the Person, and Society Course Cluster.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
SOC 202

Media and Society

This course offers a sociological perspective on the relationship between the media and society. Media narratives and imagery affect public perceptions of social phenomena as diverse as gender, crime, family relationships, disability, wealth, race/ethnicity, politics, and popular culture. As such, it is important to understand how those narratives and imagery are shaped by the structure of the media industry, including media concentration, inequality of access, and the proliferation of media platforms including the emergence of new media. Counts as a course in the Media, the Person, and Society Course Cluster.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
PSY 313

Consumer Behavior

The course introduces uses the psychological principles to understand why consumers behave the way they do and how marketers use their knowledge of consumer behavior in their work. Students will learn how psychological research methods speak to ways in which consumer behavior is assessed along with the theories and conceptual frameworks that guide consumer mental processes that lead to the actual behavior of buying products to mental processes afterwards. The intersection between cognition, affect and social influences on consumer behavior will be discussed. Students can then apply this knowledge to understanding themselves as consumers. Counts as a course in the Media, the Person, and Society Course Cluster.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
SOC 304

Media Literacy

This course is designed to foster an informed, critical, and practice understanding of how exposure to popular media influences the way we see the world. Through examination of topics such as the influence of advertising on media content, techniques of media persuasion and spin, and deconstruction of the subtle (and not so subtle) proliferation of media-driven cultural narratives and imagery, students will develop the media literacy and analytic skills needed to evaluate the accuracy and agenda of the media content they consume. Counts as a course in the Media, the Person, and Society Course Cluster.

Prerequisites: SOC-202

3.0
PSY 425

The Science of Wellbeing

This course explores the science and application of positive psychology through a review of the psychological strengths that allow individuals and societies to thrive. Students will be provided access to landmark and current research defining and establishing this new science of wellbeing. Counts as a course in the Personal Growth Course Cluster.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
SOC 407

Social Media

This course provides a sociological perspective on how the emergence of social media influences both social institutions and interpersonal relationships. Students will examine the effects of computer-mediated communications systems such as social networking platforms, e-mail, online chat rooms and forums, on-line games, and other new media venues affect how we interact with each other, develop virtual identities and communities, and engage with the social world. Key issues such as privacy, the digital divide, cyberbullying, internet activism, and internet addiction will be addressed. Counts as a course in the Media, the Person, and Society Course Cluster.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: SOC-202

3.0
FA 331

Media and Culture

Technologies from the invention of writing to the inception of social media have influenced politics, journalism, andculltural production. As they explore aesthetic strategies and techniques in various media, students will engage with the material through both scholarship and practice. Selected readings from scholars, artists, and media activists will provide background and analysis of the history, theory, politics, and methods of participatory media. Students will critically analyze the relationships between media, audience, information, and power and consider the relationship between a participatory democracy and alternative media sources. Students will investigate the politics of representation and will learn to identify bias and manipulation and to recognize and analyze visual and textual systems of cultural codes at work in mass media. In their own projects, they will make use of this knowledge to create their own media messages to work most effectively within the visual and cultural codes they are challenging.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
RS 102

Belief & Unbelief in the Brave New World

This introductory course in the phenomenon of religious faith examines the classic examples of the case for and against living in faith,with the view of enabling students to evaluate their own attitudes toward religion. Faith traditions of Western and Eastern cultures provide additional data for this evaluation.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
PHI/SOC

Choose one elective from PHI 211 or SOC 411

3

Work, the Person, and Society

Course Number Course Name Credits
PSY 211

Working on a Team

Teamwork is a common facet of life, be it in athletics, health care, academics, organizations and/or the workplace. This course will acquaint the student with the science that provides us with best practices in teamwork. Students will learn about the various types of teams and settings they operate in, how they are best developed, and issues associated with their optimal performance. Counts as a course in the Work, the Person, and Society Course Cluster.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
SOC 206

Sociology of Work

Work (including both paid employment and unpaid labor) plays a central role in shaping social relations, social inequality, and identity in the contemporary United States. Students will examine how the nature of work and employment have been transformed in the current labor market as well as the impact of those changes on other social institutions such as the family. Attention will also be paid to the racial, gender, class, and other categorical barriers to full inclusion, equality and advancement in the workplace and how those barriers may be affected by organizational structures, policies, and practices. Counts as a course in the Work, the Person, and Society Course Cluster.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
PSY 318

Industrial and Organizational Psychology

This course is designed to serve as an introduction to psychology in the workplace. Industrial/Organizational (I/O) Psychology is concerned with the development, validation, and ongoing refinement, improvement of applications of psychological methods and principles to management, employee functions and other issues in work settings. Counts as a course in the Work, the Person, and Society Course Cluster.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
SOC 320

Inequality in the Labor Force

This course examines the problems of inequality and discrimination in the workplace, identifying specific groups most suffering from discrimination based on sex, age and state of health. Strategies for reducing these inequalities will also be explored. Counts as a course in the Work, the Person, and Society Course Cluster.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: SOC-206

3.0
PSY 416

Motivation in the Workplace

The workplace is a major opportunity for people to find purpose, meaning, and happiness in their lives. This course will study the latest research on what makes people happy at work, on how happiness at work improves the quality of work, on how people and organizations develop wisdom, and on what makes a career not just successful but meaningful. Also discussed will be some of the impediments-both individual and organizational-to doing meaningful and satisfying work. Students will develop their own visions of their ideal career, and of the ideal company they'd like to lead or work for. Counts as a course in the Work, the Person, and Society Course Cluster.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
SOC 403

American Labor Movement

This course explores how American people built this nation through individual, family, communal and political action, from the rise of industrial capitalism in the late nineteenth century, to the present day. As students engage with each other in extensive weekly discussions, analyze the textbook, watch video clips, and research and write their term paper, they are encouraged to reflect on how their own life has been influenced by the efforts of previous generations to make a good life and a decent society. While the course will focus on how people worked, and what their workplaces were like, it will also focus on how political movements, business innovations and government policies shaped workplaces and created the rules by which we live and work today. Counts as a course in the Work, the Person, and Society Course Cluster.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: SOC-206

3.0
MGT 304

Communicating in Organizations

The course deals with the relation of interpersonal communication to communications strategies in organizations. Students analyze communication networks and the relationship to group characteristics and productivity, leadership and conflict as they relate to communication in the organization.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: MGT-305 or Permission of Instructor

3.0
MGT/SOC

Choose one elective from MGT 350 or SOC 416

3

Major: 51-60
Core requirements and electives: 69
Total: 120-129

Careers

Careers

A sociology degree gives you a solid liberal arts foundation for a wide range of career paths. Sociology can open doors in business or human services. You can pursue a career in criminology, counseling, healthcare management, secondary or elementary teaching, government service, or employment with non-profit organizations.

Sociology graduates can pursue entry-level positions in:

  • Teaching - elementary and secondary schools, when combined with appropriate teacher certification.
  • Publishing, Journalism and Public Relations - writing, research and editing.
  • Government Services - federal, state or local government jobs in areas such as transportation, housing, agriculture, and labor.
  • Social Services - rehabilitation, case management, group work with youth or the elderly, recreation or administration.
  • Community Work - fundraising, child care, community development, or environmental groups.
  • Corrections - probation, parole, or other criminal justice work.
  • College and university settings - admissions, alumni relations, or placement.
  • Health Services - family planning, substance abuse, rehabilitation counseling, health planning, hospital admissions, insurance companies.

The search for employment allows you to discover your talents and skills and match them to career opportunities. Pursue employment with an adventurous and calculating spirit and the position you find is likely to be personally and professionally rewarding.

Graduate Education Opportunities

An undergraduate degree in sociology can prepare you for a master's degree in sociology, law, rehabilitation counseling, social work, business management, student personnel, teaching, college administration, health education, healthcare administration, or urban planning.

Graduate schools are selective and you'll need to develop your scholarly abilities and academic skills in order to mount a competitive application. The sociology faculty and your academic advisor will work with you in planning your academic and professional future and in taking the steps to pursue your goals. This process begins during your sophomore year. If you decide to go for a graduate degree, the faculty will tailor your coursework to enhance your research and scholarly skills.

Internships

Internships

During their senior year, Sociology majors are required to complete an intensive internship. While interning, students are required to complete a minimum of 45 hours of on-site experience. Students work closely with their faculty advisor and internship site supervisor throughout their off-campus experience. The internship gives students a chance to apply their sociological knowledge, to be a participant/observer in an organization or agency related to career interests, and to contribute to the community while studying.

The internship also introduces students to employment possibilities while they receive valuable field experience and build community contacts and employment references. The student's faculty advisor ensures the student is maximizing their potential during the internship experience, and is applying and developing marketable skill-sets. The internship experience prepares students for the competitive job market and for scholarships for advanced study.

Internship Placements

Related Programs

Liberal Arts Department In The News

View All
06.11
D'Youville Announces Plan to Address Racial Justice

D'Youville announced three initiatives today to elevate the issue of racial inequality and add support to racial justice as a strategic inst...

Read more
04.17
D'Youville Announces Summer of Learning Initiative

D'Youville announced the Summer of Learning initiative to help students continue progressing with their education during summer after a disr...

Read more
Designed as an advisor in your pocket, the app allows students to sync their schedules, connect with advisors, get notifications on important dates and tasks, find study buddies from their classes, and more.
01.29
Keep Your Education on Track with the New Navigate Student App

Designed as an advisor in your pocket, the app allows students to sync their schedules, connect with advisors, get notifications on importan...

Read more