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Exercise and Sports Studies (BS), 4-Year

ESS students working out in the Fitness Center

D’Youville's Exercise & Sports Studies program prepares students to understand various dimensions of the health professions, fitness industry, and competitive athletics.

Overview & Distinctions

Overview

People are becoming increasingly conscious about the importance of exercise and sports as vital elements to maintaining and improving their own personal health. In fact, interest in sports as a whole has become so great that industry experts estimate the size of the global sports industry at $1.5 trillion dollars worldwide — making sports one of the largest industries in the world.

If you're interested in a career in sports, fitness, or healthcare, D'Youville's Exercise and Sports Studies program offers three pathways to earn a bachelor’s degree in exercise and sports studies designed to prepare you for a career in these rapidly-growing industries.

Pathways to earn a degree

Bachelor's Degree

Students interested in pursuing a bachelor’s degree can choose from two tracks:

  • Exercise Studies Track: Students in this track learn the health and fitness aspects of the exercise sciences, ideal for preparing for a career in the fitness industry as a professional offering training and guidance in a variety of settings.
  • Sports Studies Track: If you're interested in sports management, the business of fitness, or coaching, the Sports Studies Track provides you with a solid foundation by teaching you the social, psychological, business, and management aspects of these industries.

Bachelor’s Degree (BS) + Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) Combined Degree Program

If you're interested in a career as a professional physical therapist, our sequential degree program allows you to enter D'Youville as a freshman and graduate in six years with a bachelor’s degree in Exercise & Sports Studies and a Doctor of Physical Therapy degree.

As a student in the sequential degree program you'll be eligible for direct entry into the three-year professional graduate DPT program after you receive your bachelor's degree. Simply maintain an overall GPA of 3.0 and a B or better overall and a 3.2 GPA in all the DPT prerequisite courses and you're in!

BACHELOR’S DEGREE (BS) + DOCTOR OF Chiropractic (DC) COMBINED DEGREE PROGRAM

Students interested in chiropractic can enroll in the sequential-degree program, Exercise and Sports Studies (BS) + Doctor of Chiropractic (DC). Entering freshmen complete a BS in ESS under the administration of the ESS department. Students choosing the chiropractic track intimately study the basic sciences (chemistry, physics, anatomy and physiology) in addition to the exercise sciences in preparation for the chiropractic graduate program. Maintain an overall GPA of 3.0 and a B or better in all the chiropractic prerequisite courses to qualify.

Why Choose D'Youville?

  • D'Youville's growing NCAA Division-III athletic programs for men and women provides sports participation and learning opportunities as a student in the Exercise & Sports Studies program. 
  • Our nationally-recognized Center for Research on Physical Activity, Sport, & Health will provide you with the kind of research experience that's respected and sought-after by employers and graduate programs.
  • By combining classroom instruction with internship experiences, our program will prepare you to enter a professional role in the sports/fitness and wellness industry as soon as you graduate.
  • D'Youville's commitment to a liberal education means that you'll learn how to solve problems, think critically, work well with others, and communicate effectively ... all skills that today's employers are looking for.

AUTOMATIC MERIT-BASED SCHOLARSHIP CONSIDERATION

When you apply for admission at D’Youville, we’ll automatically consider you for our merit scholarships. Undergraduate scholarships can cover as much as 50% of your tuition, and there is no need to fill out a separate application!

Transfer students can qualify for scholarships, as well. And unlike other schools, maintaining your scholarship is easier at D'Youville because we use a realistic 2.25 GPA requirement to determine your eligibility for merit-based scholarships each year. 

Check out the chart below to see if you qualify:
Scholarships GPA Scholarship Amount
President's 88+ $14,000
Founder's 83 - 87.9 $12,000
Dean's 80 - 82.9 $10,000
Transfer 3.5+ $5,500
Transfer 3.25 - 3.49 $5,000
Transfer 3.0 - 3.24 $4,500
Transfer 2.75 - 2.99 $4,000

Find more information and additional scholarships on our scholarships page.

View All Scholarships

Curriculum

Exercise and Sports Studies
Degree: B.S.

Core Course Requirements for the Major (Track 1:Exercise Studies)

Course Number Course Name Credits
FYE 100

Life Unpacked

This class provides first-year students with support and guidance in a variety of skills and practices necessary to becoming a successful college student. The course covers studying and note-taking skills, library and research skills, and making an effective transition from high school to college. The class also features a series of presentations from faculty in various disciplines within the General Education curriculum, designed to introduce students to the various academic possibilities and career paths for majors, minors, and electives. Finally, students in the class will participate in a number of cultural events.
Offered in: Fall and Spring
Prerequisites: None

2.0
ENG/HIS 112

One Elective from ENG 112 or HIS 112

 Choose one elective from ENG 112 or HIS 112
3
PHI/RS 103

One Elective from PHI 103 or RS 103

Choose one elective from PHI 103 or RS 103
3
Total 8

Subtotal: 12

Course Number Course Name Credits
GE 2XX Choose three level 200 themed courses 9
GE 3XX Choose two level 300 themed courses 6
GE 4XX Capstone 3
Total 18

Subtotal: 18 

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 107

Human Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a study of the structural and functional relationships of the human organism, emphasizing cells and tissues, the integument, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and sense organs. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: one semester of college chemistry., BIO-107L

3.0
BIO 107L

Human Anatomy & Physiology Laboratory

This course accompanies BIO-107. This course consists of three hours of lab a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-107

1.0
BIO 108

Human Anatomy & Physiology II

This continuation of BIO 107 emphasizes the digestive system, respiratory system, blood, cardiovascular system, urinary system, reproductive systems, endocrine system, human genetics and development. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-107 BIO-107L, BIO-108L

3.0
BIO 108L

Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab

This course accompanies BIO-108. This course consists of three hours of lab a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-108

1.0
CHE 111

Chemistry for Health Sciences

This is a survey of general and organic chemistry that emphasizes fundamental principles and the properties and characteristics of important groups of chemicals. This course consists of three lectures per week.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
CHE 112

Chemistry for Health Sciences II

This survey of metabolism in the cell includes the instruction of compounds and other components involved in metabolism and regulation of metabolism. The course consists of two lectures per week

Prerequisites: CHE-111

2.0
CHE 113L

Chemistry for the Health Sciences Lab

The laboratory exercises illustrate principles, techniques and practices of general chemistry, organic chemistry and biochemistry. The lab consists of three hours of laboratory a week

Prerequisites: CHE-111, CHE-112

1.0
BIO 339

Human Gross Anatomy

This is a lecture and laboratory course in human gross anatomy, which uses cadaver dissection and other materials illustrative of human anatomy. Emphasis will be placed upon the anatomy of skeletal muscles, including their bony attachments, nerve and blood supply and their functions in movements. Additional dissections will involve a survey of abdominal and thoracic organs, anatomy of the head and contents of the cranial cavity. The course consists of two lecture hours and eight lab hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-339L. Physician Assistant students will take BIO-639L., (BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L) or BIO-317.

6.0
PSY 101

General Psychology

This course is an overall survey of the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Specifically, the biopsychosocial model will be used to explore the major areas within psychology. Counts as a required course in the Nuts and Bolts Course Cluster for all Psychology majors.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
SOC 312

Sociology of Sports and Phys Activity

This course will investigate the institution of sports from a sociological perspective as it relates to contemporary American organized sports. The perspective taken is that sport is a social entity and thus serves as a microcosm of society and a window through which to view sociological processes. This course will investigate how social phenomenon such as stratification, discrimination, violence, race, and gender are evident in amateur and professional athletics. We will also examine how sports relate to sociological conceptions of community. This course is intended to help you develop a better understanding of how sports are related to broader sociological processes in society. Contemporary American sports are given central focus. Using a variety of readings and online discussions surrounding sports, students will explore the positive and negative consequences, societal risks, and ethical issues related to sports in society. In the process, students will develop a critical approach towards the study of sports. Other topics addressed by this course include the study of sports and socialization, intercollegiate and interscholastic sports, violence and more generally deviance in relation to sports. Counts as a course in the Social Institutions Course Cluster.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: SOC-101

3.0
LAS Electives Choose two LAS electives 6
Total 32

Subtotal: 32

Course Number Course Name Credits
ESS 101

Introduction to Exercise and Sports Studies

This course introduces students to the many sub-disciplines of exercise and sports science. An interdisciplinary approach is used to explore the various biomedical and psychosocial dimensions of physical activity, sport and exercise. Students will study a range of topics including links between physical activity and disease risk, as well as the influence of exercise and conditioning on athletic performance, disease prevention, and physical fitness.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
ESS 201

Principles of First Aid in Athletic Injury

This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic aspects of immediate and temporary care of athletic and sports-related injury and illness. Safety concerns regarding exercise facilities and equipment, and risk management are emphasized, along with recognition and care of physical activity-related injuries and illnesses. This course will also stress issues pertaining to professional certification, medical liability and other legal issues present in health, fitness and competitive sports industries.

Prerequisites: ESS-101

3.0
ESS 206

Coaching Theory & Methodology

This course is designed to analyze the fundamental theories and practices of coaching sports and/or athletics, and to familiarize students with the inherent differences of coaching theory at various levels of competitive and recreational athletics. It includes a study of the psychological and sociological aspects of coaching, the use and implementation of coaching strategies, the organization of practices and games, communication with athletes, fans, schools, parents and the media, as well as the ethics of coaching.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
ESS 220

Human Biomechanics

This course is designed to apply principles of human anatomy that will develop into an understanding of human movement as it corresponds to exercise, athletic performance, and injury prevention. Forces that influence the human body, both at rest and during physical activity, will be discussed with emphasis on the principles underlying human movement, muscle physiology and muscular contraction

Prerequisites: ESS-101

3.0
ESS 232

Sport & Exercise Psychology

This course is designed to explore the relationship between sport, fitness, and various inherent behaviors unique to the sport and fitness industries. The application of psychological theory, research, and practice to sport and fitness settings can contribute immensely to an individual's athletic performance and level of participation. This course seeks to provide a solid scientific foundation to further study the practice of sport and exercise psychology. Furthermore, possessing an understanding of the psychological/mental factors that affect athletic performance in sport,physical activity and exercise is an important skill to possess for the individual practitioners in the exercise and sports studies field.

Prerequisites: ESS-101 or permission of the instructor.

3.0
ESS 270

Exercise and Sports Studies Practicum

This course gives students the opportunity to gain practical experience in the health and fitness industry and to explore the career options available in the field of exercise and sports studies. Students will research the various career pathways open in the exercise and sports field through both secondary sources and documented first-hand observation within various educational settings, community-based athletic programs, fitness centers, sports medicine clinics, athletic teams or corporate settings.

Prerequisites: ESS-101

3.0
ESS 301

Fitness Eval & Exercise Prescription

This course is designed to familiarize students with the theoretical background and practical applications needed to competently assess levels of physical fitness and markers of athletic performance, and to develop effective and appropriate exercise programs based on individual goals and objectives.

Prerequisites: ESS-201

3.0
ESS 306

Exercise Physiology

This course serves to develop in students an intimate understanding of systemic and metabolic physiology within the physically active individual. Students will gain a thorough understanding of various body systems and the acute responses and chronic adaptations that occur as a result of exercise stress. Overall, students will develop a basic knowledge and understanding of the functional limitations of the human organism during exercise.

Prerequisites: ESS-101

3.0
ESS 410

Strength & Conditioning Seminar

This course will covers the basic principles of strength training & conditioning for physical fitness and athletic development. Students will focus on proper resistance training technique; how to strengthen major muscle groups; how to develop speed, agility, and endurance; and how to obtain and maintain a high level of fitness while executing a quality exercise program. Students are exposed to various other methods of strength training and conditioning, as well as theories behind their use.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
ESS 470

Exercise and Sports Studies: Internship

This ESS internship experience provides students with the opportunity to gain practical, hands-on experience within an exercise and sports studies facility. By agreement of the instructor, student and community internship site, the student will complete a total of 125 hours at a community-based internship site.

Prerequisites: ESS-101

3.0
ESS 490

Exercise and Sports Studies Seminar

This course provides the student with extensive faculty and peer guidance and feedback throughout a research or community-based internship experience. In addition, this course guides students through the transition from college into the workforce or graduate school. Students are tasked with professional development opportunities, workplace conduct, resume-building, and a host of other tasks designed to prepare them for the next phase of their professional career. Course taken concurrently with ESS Internship.

Prerequisites: ESS-470, ESS-101

0.0
HP 203

Medical Terminology

This course applies medical terminology including word components (root word, prefix and suffix), medical abbreviations, pathologies and diagnostic tests. Students also learn how to conduct a chart review, interpret admission notes, surgical reports, discharge summaries, and understand the components of a SOAP note.

Prerequisites: None

1.0
NTR 325

Nutrition and Health

The course will introduce the student to nutrition science and public health issues related to nutrition. The fundamentals of carbohydrates,protein, lipids, vitamins, minerals and metabolism will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on diet planning and analysis, energy balance and the role of diet and physical activity in a healthy lifestyle and disease prevention. Highlights of current topics in nutrition, such as eating disorders, vegetarian lifestyles and fad diets will also be addressed.

Prerequisites: 1 college level chemistry course.

3.0
DTC 328

Nutrition for Fitness & Athletic Performance

This two-credit course will introduce the student to the integrated science of nutrition and exercise physiology. The course will explore macro- and micronutrient needs as related to energy demands, cellular function, and growth, maintenance, and repair. Students will explore how optimal nutrition is essential for optimal performance. The course will focus on scientifically sound, evidence-based practice and examine sources of unsound sport nutrition recommendations. Assignments will allow students to gain a greater understanding of the energy requirements of exercise as well as the barriers to increased physical activity. This course consists of two lecture hours.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: (DTC-306) or (NTR-325)

2.0
Electives Choose eight free electives 24
Total 60

Subtotal: 60
Total: 122



Core Course Requirements for the Major (Track 2:Sport Studies) 



Course Number Course Name Credits
FYE 100

Life Unpacked

This class provides first-year students with support and guidance in a variety of skills and practices necessary to becoming a successful college student. The course covers studying and note-taking skills, library and research skills, and making an effective transition from high school to college. The class also features a series of presentations from faculty in various disciplines within the General Education curriculum, designed to introduce students to the various academic possibilities and career paths for majors, minors, and electives. Finally, students in the class will participate in a number of cultural events.
Offered in: Fall and Spring
Prerequisites: None

2.0
ENG/HIS 112

One Elective from ENG 112 or HIS 112

 Choose one elective from ENG 112 or HIS 112
3
PHI/RS 103

One Elective from PHI 103 or RS 103

Choose one elective from PHI 103 or RS 103
3
Total 8

Subtotal: 12

Course Number Course Name Credits
GE 2XX Choose three level 200 themed courses 9
GE 3XX Choose two level 300 themed courses 6
GE 4XX Capstone 3
Total 18

Subtotal: 18


Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 107

Human Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a study of the structural and functional relationships of the human organism, emphasizing cells and tissues, the integument, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and sense organs. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: one semester of college chemistry., BIO-107L

3.0
BIO 107L

Human Anatomy & Physiology Laboratory

This course accompanies BIO-107. This course consists of three hours of lab a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-107

1.0
BIO 108

Human Anatomy & Physiology II

This continuation of BIO 107 emphasizes the digestive system, respiratory system, blood, cardiovascular system, urinary system, reproductive systems, endocrine system, human genetics and development. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-107 BIO-107L, BIO-108L

3.0
BIO 108L

Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab

This course accompanies BIO-108. This course consists of three hours of lab a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-108

1.0
CHE 111

Chemistry for Health Sciences

This is a survey of general and organic chemistry that emphasizes fundamental principles and the properties and characteristics of important groups of chemicals. This course consists of three lectures per week.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
CHE 112

Chemistry for Health Sciences II

This survey of metabolism in the cell includes the instruction of compounds and other components involved in metabolism and regulation of metabolism. The course consists of two lectures per week

Prerequisites: CHE-111

2.0
CHE 113L

Chemistry for the Health Sciences Lab

The laboratory exercises illustrate principles, techniques and practices of general chemistry, organic chemistry and biochemistry. The lab consists of three hours of laboratory a week

Prerequisites: CHE-111, CHE-112

1.0
MAT 123

Introduction to Applied Statistics

This course includes the underlying fundamental mathematical principles and their application to a wide range of statistical methods and tests. Included are the following: sampling, frequency distributions, probability, regression,confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, t-test, analysis of variance, chi-square and correlation. Existent computer software such as MiniTab is utilized by students to aid and facilitate the analysis of results. Not open to those who have taken MAT-120

Prerequisites: None

4.0
PHY 111

Introduction to Physics

This course is designed for health services/PT majors and for other students who wish to use it to fulfill part of thhe core requirement in scienceeir Liberal Arts and Sciences requirements. The course lecture must be taken prior to, or concurrently with, the corresponding lab. PHY-111 covers kinematics, dynamics, conservation of energy and momentum, and rotational motion. PHY-112 covers statics, fluids, oscillations, sound and waves, temperature and heat, electricity and magnetism, and ray optics.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
PHY 112

Introduction to Physics

The course lecture must be taken prior to, or concurrently with, the corresponding lab. PHY-111 covers kinematics, dynamics, conservation of energy and momentum, and rotational motion. PHY-112 covers statics, fluids, oscillations, sound and waves, temperature and heat, electricity and magnetism, and ray optics.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
PHY 112L

Introduction to Physics Lab

This course is a physics laboratory to accompany PHY-112.

Prerequisites: None

1.0
PSY 101

General Psychology

This course is an overall survey of the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Specifically, the biopsychosocial model will be used to explore the major areas within psychology. Counts as a required course in the Nuts and Bolts Course Cluster for all Psychology majors.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
SOC 312

Sociology of Sports and Phys Activity

This course will investigate the institution of sports from a sociological perspective as it relates to contemporary American organized sports. The perspective taken is that sport is a social entity and thus serves as a microcosm of society and a window through which to view sociological processes. This course will investigate how social phenomenon such as stratification, discrimination, violence, race, and gender are evident in amateur and professional athletics. We will also examine how sports relate to sociological conceptions of community. This course is intended to help you develop a better understanding of how sports are related to broader sociological processes in society. Contemporary American sports are given central focus. Using a variety of readings and online discussions surrounding sports, students will explore the positive and negative consequences, societal risks, and ethical issues related to sports in society. In the process, students will develop a critical approach towards the study of sports. Other topics addressed by this course include the study of sports and socialization, intercollegiate and interscholastic sports, violence and more generally deviance in relation to sports. Counts as a course in the Social Institutions Course Cluster.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: SOC-101

3.0
Total 31

Subtotal: 32

In Other Academic Areas Required for the Major
Course Number Course Name Credits
ESS 101

Introduction to Exercise and Sports Studies

This course introduces students to the many sub-disciplines of exercise and sports science. An interdisciplinary approach is used to explore the various biomedical and psychosocial dimensions of physical activity, sport and exercise. Students will study a range of topics including links between physical activity and disease risk, as well as the influence of exercise and conditioning on athletic performance, disease prevention, and physical fitness.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
ESS 201

Principles of First Aid in Athletic Injury

This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic aspects of immediate and temporary care of athletic and sports-related injury and illness. Safety concerns regarding exercise facilities and equipment, and risk management are emphasized, along with recognition and care of physical activity-related injuries and illnesses. This course will also stress issues pertaining to professional certification, medical liability and other legal issues present in health, fitness and competitive sports industries.

Prerequisites: ESS-101

3.0
ESS 206

Coaching Theory & Methodology

This course is designed to analyze the fundamental theories and practices of coaching sports and/or athletics, and to familiarize students with the inherent differences of coaching theory at various levels of competitive and recreational athletics. It includes a study of the psychological and sociological aspects of coaching, the use and implementation of coaching strategies, the organization of practices and games, communication with athletes, fans, schools, parents and the media, as well as the ethics of coaching.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
ESS 220

Human Biomechanics

This course is designed to apply principles of human anatomy that will develop into an understanding of human movement as it corresponds to exercise, athletic performance, and injury prevention. Forces that influence the human body, both at rest and during physical activity, will be discussed with emphasis on the principles underlying human movement, muscle physiology and muscular contraction

Prerequisites: ESS-101

3.0
ESS 232

Sport & Exercise Psychology

This course is designed to explore the relationship between sport, fitness, and various inherent behaviors unique to the sport and fitness industries. The application of psychological theory, research, and practice to sport and fitness settings can contribute immensely to an individual's athletic performance and level of participation. This course seeks to provide a solid scientific foundation to further study the practice of sport and exercise psychology. Furthermore, possessing an understanding of the psychological/mental factors that affect athletic performance in sport,physical activity and exercise is an important skill to possess for the individual practitioners in the exercise and sports studies field.

Prerequisites: ESS-101 or permission of the instructor.

3.0
ESS 270

Exercise and Sports Studies Practicum

This course gives students the opportunity to gain practical experience in the health and fitness industry and to explore the career options available in the field of exercise and sports studies. Students will research the various career pathways open in the exercise and sports field through both secondary sources and documented first-hand observation within various educational settings, community-based athletic programs, fitness centers, sports medicine clinics, athletic teams or corporate settings.

Prerequisites: ESS-101

3.0
ESS 301

Fitness Eval & Exercise Prescription

This course is designed to familiarize students with the theoretical background and practical applications needed to competently assess levels of physical fitness and markers of athletic performance, and to develop effective and appropriate exercise programs based on individual goals and objectives.

Prerequisites: ESS-201

3.0
ESS 306

Exercise Physiology

This course serves to develop in students an intimate understanding of systemic and metabolic physiology within the physically active individual. Students will gain a thorough understanding of various body systems and the acute responses and chronic adaptations that occur as a result of exercise stress. Overall, students will develop a basic knowledge and understanding of the functional limitations of the human organism during exercise.

Prerequisites: ESS-101

3.0
ESS 410

Strength & Conditioning Seminar

This course will covers the basic principles of strength training & conditioning for physical fitness and athletic development. Students will focus on proper resistance training technique; how to strengthen major muscle groups; how to develop speed, agility, and endurance; and how to obtain and maintain a high level of fitness while executing a quality exercise program. Students are exposed to various other methods of strength training and conditioning, as well as theories behind their use.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
ESS 470

Exercise and Sports Studies: Internship

This ESS internship experience provides students with the opportunity to gain practical, hands-on experience within an exercise and sports studies facility. By agreement of the instructor, student and community internship site, the student will complete a total of 125 hours at a community-based internship site.

Prerequisites: ESS-101

3.0
ESS 490

Exercise and Sports Studies Seminar

This course provides the student with extensive faculty and peer guidance and feedback throughout a research or community-based internship experience. In addition, this course guides students through the transition from college into the workforce or graduate school. Students are tasked with professional development opportunities, workplace conduct, resume-building, and a host of other tasks designed to prepare them for the next phase of their professional career. Course taken concurrently with ESS Internship.

Prerequisites: ESS-470, ESS-101

0.0
HP 203

Medical Terminology

This course applies medical terminology including word components (root word, prefix and suffix), medical abbreviations, pathologies and diagnostic tests. Students also learn how to conduct a chart review, interpret admission notes, surgical reports, discharge summaries, and understand the components of a SOAP note.

Prerequisites: None

1.0
NTR 325

Nutrition and Health

The course will introduce the student to nutrition science and public health issues related to nutrition. The fundamentals of carbohydrates,protein, lipids, vitamins, minerals and metabolism will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on diet planning and analysis, energy balance and the role of diet and physical activity in a healthy lifestyle and disease prevention. Highlights of current topics in nutrition, such as eating disorders, vegetarian lifestyles and fad diets will also be addressed.

Prerequisites: 1 college level chemistry course.

3.0
DTC 328

Nutrition for Fitness & Athletic Performance

This two-credit course will introduce the student to the integrated science of nutrition and exercise physiology. The course will explore macro- and micronutrient needs as related to energy demands, cellular function, and growth, maintenance, and repair. Students will explore how optimal nutrition is essential for optimal performance. The course will focus on scientifically sound, evidence-based practice and examine sources of unsound sport nutrition recommendations. Assignments will allow students to gain a greater understanding of the energy requirements of exercise as well as the barriers to increased physical activity. This course consists of two lecture hours.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: (DTC-306) or (NTR-325)

2.0
Electives Choose eight free electives 24
Total 60

Subtotal: 60
Total: 122



Core Course Requirements for the Major (Track 3:Pre-Chiropractic) 

Course Number Course Name Credits
FYE 100

Life Unpacked

This class provides first-year students with support and guidance in a variety of skills and practices necessary to becoming a successful college student. The course covers studying and note-taking skills, library and research skills, and making an effective transition from high school to college. The class also features a series of presentations from faculty in various disciplines within the General Education curriculum, designed to introduce students to the various academic possibilities and career paths for majors, minors, and electives. Finally, students in the class will participate in a number of cultural events.
Offered in: Fall and Spring
Prerequisites: None

2.0
ENG/HIS 112

One Elective from ENG 112 or HIS 112

 Choose one elective from ENG 112 or HIS 112
3
PHI/RS 103

One Elective from PHI 103 or RS 103

Choose one elective from PHI 103 or RS 103
3
Total 8

Subtotal: 12

Course Number Course Name Credits
GE 2XX Choose three level 200 themed courses 9
GE 3XX Choose two level 300 themed courses 6
GE 4XX Capstone 3
Total 18

Subtotal: 18

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 107

Human Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a study of the structural and functional relationships of the human organism, emphasizing cells and tissues, the integument, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and sense organs. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: one semester of college chemistry., BIO-107L

3.0
BIO 107L

Human Anatomy & Physiology Laboratory

This course accompanies BIO-107. This course consists of three hours of lab a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-107

1.0
BIO 108

Human Anatomy & Physiology II

This continuation of BIO 107 emphasizes the digestive system, respiratory system, blood, cardiovascular system, urinary system, reproductive systems, endocrine system, human genetics and development. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-107 BIO-107L, BIO-108L

3.0
BIO 108L

Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab

This course accompanies BIO-108. This course consists of three hours of lab a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-108

1.0
CHE 111

Chemistry for Health Sciences

This is a survey of general and organic chemistry that emphasizes fundamental principles and the properties and characteristics of important groups of chemicals. This course consists of three lectures per week.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
CHE 112

Chemistry for Health Sciences II

This survey of metabolism in the cell includes the instruction of compounds and other components involved in metabolism and regulation of metabolism. The course consists of two lectures per week

Prerequisites: CHE-111

2.0
CHE 113L

Chemistry for the Health Sciences Lab

The laboratory exercises illustrate principles, techniques and practices of general chemistry, organic chemistry and biochemistry. The lab consists of three hours of laboratory a week

Prerequisites: CHE-111, CHE-112

1.0
CHE 209

Principles of Organic Chemistry

This is a survey of organic chemistry, including functional groups and their chemical behavior. Compounds of importance to biology and biochemistry are stressed. This course cannot be taken in place of either CHE-219 or CHE-220.
Offered in: Fall and Spring
Prerequisites: CHE-102, CHE-209L or CHE-219L

3.0
CHE 209L

Principles of Organic Chemistry Lab

This is a laboratory course to compliment the material discussed in CHE-209,which is one-semester survey course of organic chemistry.
Offered in: Fall and Spring
Prerequisites: CHE-209 or CHE-219

1.0
MAT 123

Introduction to Applied Statistics

This course includes the underlying fundamental mathematical principles and their application to a wide range of statistical methods and tests. Included are the following: sampling, frequency distributions, probability, regression,confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, t-test, analysis of variance, chi-square and correlation. Existent computer software such as MiniTab is utilized by students to aid and facilitate the analysis of results. Not open to those who have taken MAT-120

Prerequisites: None

4.0
PHY 111

Introduction to Physics

This course is designed for health services/PT majors and for other students who wish to use it to fulfill part of thhe core requirement in scienceeir Liberal Arts and Sciences requirements. The course lecture must be taken prior to, or concurrently with, the corresponding lab. PHY-111 covers kinematics, dynamics, conservation of energy and momentum, and rotational motion. PHY-112 covers statics, fluids, oscillations, sound and waves, temperature and heat, electricity and magnetism, and ray optics.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
PHY 111L

Introduction to Physics Lab

This course is a physics laboratory to accompany PHY-111.

Prerequisites: None

1.0
PHY 112

Introduction to Physics

The course lecture must be taken prior to, or concurrently with, the corresponding lab. PHY-111 covers kinematics, dynamics, conservation of energy and momentum, and rotational motion. PHY-112 covers statics, fluids, oscillations, sound and waves, temperature and heat, electricity and magnetism, and ray optics.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
PHY 112L

Introduction to Physics Lab

This course is a physics laboratory to accompany PHY-112.

Prerequisites: None

1.0
PSY 101

General Psychology

This course is an overall survey of the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Specifically, the biopsychosocial model will be used to explore the major areas within psychology. Counts as a required course in the Nuts and Bolts Course Cluster for all Psychology majors.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
SOC 312

Sociology of Sports and Phys Activity

This course will investigate the institution of sports from a sociological perspective as it relates to contemporary American organized sports. The perspective taken is that sport is a social entity and thus serves as a microcosm of society and a window through which to view sociological processes. This course will investigate how social phenomenon such as stratification, discrimination, violence, race, and gender are evident in amateur and professional athletics. We will also examine how sports relate to sociological conceptions of community. This course is intended to help you develop a better understanding of how sports are related to broader sociological processes in society. Contemporary American sports are given central focus. Using a variety of readings and online discussions surrounding sports, students will explore the positive and negative consequences, societal risks, and ethical issues related to sports in society. In the process, students will develop a critical approach towards the study of sports. Other topics addressed by this course include the study of sports and socialization, intercollegiate and interscholastic sports, violence and more generally deviance in relation to sports. Counts as a course in the Social Institutions Course Cluster.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: SOC-101

3.0
Total 36

Subtotal: 36

In Other Academic Areas Required for the Major
Course Number Course Name Credits
ESS 101

Introduction to Exercise and Sports Studies

This course introduces students to the many sub-disciplines of exercise and sports science. An interdisciplinary approach is used to explore the various biomedical and psychosocial dimensions of physical activity, sport and exercise. Students will study a range of topics including links between physical activity and disease risk, as well as the influence of exercise and conditioning on athletic performance, disease prevention, and physical fitness.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
ESS 201

Principles of First Aid in Athletic Injury

This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic aspects of immediate and temporary care of athletic and sports-related injury and illness. Safety concerns regarding exercise facilities and equipment, and risk management are emphasized, along with recognition and care of physical activity-related injuries and illnesses. This course will also stress issues pertaining to professional certification, medical liability and other legal issues present in health, fitness and competitive sports industries.

Prerequisites: ESS-101

3.0
ESS 206

Coaching Theory & Methodology

This course is designed to analyze the fundamental theories and practices of coaching sports and/or athletics, and to familiarize students with the inherent differences of coaching theory at various levels of competitive and recreational athletics. It includes a study of the psychological and sociological aspects of coaching, the use and implementation of coaching strategies, the organization of practices and games, communication with athletes, fans, schools, parents and the media, as well as the ethics of coaching.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
ESS 220

Human Biomechanics

This course is designed to apply principles of human anatomy that will develop into an understanding of human movement as it corresponds to exercise, athletic performance, and injury prevention. Forces that influence the human body, both at rest and during physical activity, will be discussed with emphasis on the principles underlying human movement, muscle physiology and muscular contraction

Prerequisites: ESS-101

3.0
ESS 232

Sport & Exercise Psychology

This course is designed to explore the relationship between sport, fitness, and various inherent behaviors unique to the sport and fitness industries. The application of psychological theory, research, and practice to sport and fitness settings can contribute immensely to an individual's athletic performance and level of participation. This course seeks to provide a solid scientific foundation to further study the practice of sport and exercise psychology. Furthermore, possessing an understanding of the psychological/mental factors that affect athletic performance in sport,physical activity and exercise is an important skill to possess for the individual practitioners in the exercise and sports studies field.

Prerequisites: ESS-101 or permission of the instructor.

3.0
ESS 270

Exercise and Sports Studies Practicum

This course gives students the opportunity to gain practical experience in the health and fitness industry and to explore the career options available in the field of exercise and sports studies. Students will research the various career pathways open in the exercise and sports field through both secondary sources and documented first-hand observation within various educational settings, community-based athletic programs, fitness centers, sports medicine clinics, athletic teams or corporate settings.

Prerequisites: ESS-101

3.0
ESS 301

Fitness Eval & Exercise Prescription

This course is designed to familiarize students with the theoretical background and practical applications needed to competently assess levels of physical fitness and markers of athletic performance, and to develop effective and appropriate exercise programs based on individual goals and objectives.

Prerequisites: ESS-201

3.0
ESS 306

Exercise Physiology

This course serves to develop in students an intimate understanding of systemic and metabolic physiology within the physically active individual. Students will gain a thorough understanding of various body systems and the acute responses and chronic adaptations that occur as a result of exercise stress. Overall, students will develop a basic knowledge and understanding of the functional limitations of the human organism during exercise.

Prerequisites: ESS-101

3.0
ESS 410

Strength & Conditioning Seminar

This course will covers the basic principles of strength training & conditioning for physical fitness and athletic development. Students will focus on proper resistance training technique; how to strengthen major muscle groups; how to develop speed, agility, and endurance; and how to obtain and maintain a high level of fitness while executing a quality exercise program. Students are exposed to various other methods of strength training and conditioning, as well as theories behind their use.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
ESS 470

Exercise and Sports Studies: Internship

This ESS internship experience provides students with the opportunity to gain practical, hands-on experience within an exercise and sports studies facility. By agreement of the instructor, student and community internship site, the student will complete a total of 125 hours at a community-based internship site.

Prerequisites: ESS-101

3.0
ESS 490

Exercise and Sports Studies Seminar

This course provides the student with extensive faculty and peer guidance and feedback throughout a research or community-based internship experience. In addition, this course guides students through the transition from college into the workforce or graduate school. Students are tasked with professional development opportunities, workplace conduct, resume-building, and a host of other tasks designed to prepare them for the next phase of their professional career. Course taken concurrently with ESS Internship.

Prerequisites: ESS-470, ESS-101

0.0
HP 203

Medical Terminology

This course applies medical terminology including word components (root word, prefix and suffix), medical abbreviations, pathologies and diagnostic tests. Students also learn how to conduct a chart review, interpret admission notes, surgical reports, discharge summaries, and understand the components of a SOAP note.

Prerequisites: None

1.0
NTR 325

Nutrition and Health

The course will introduce the student to nutrition science and public health issues related to nutrition. The fundamentals of carbohydrates,protein, lipids, vitamins, minerals and metabolism will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on diet planning and analysis, energy balance and the role of diet and physical activity in a healthy lifestyle and disease prevention. Highlights of current topics in nutrition, such as eating disorders, vegetarian lifestyles and fad diets will also be addressed.

Prerequisites: 1 college level chemistry course.

3.0
DTC 328

Nutrition for Fitness & Athletic Performance

This two-credit course will introduce the student to the integrated science of nutrition and exercise physiology. The course will explore macro- and micronutrient needs as related to energy demands, cellular function, and growth, maintenance, and repair. Students will explore how optimal nutrition is essential for optimal performance. The course will focus on scientifically sound, evidence-based practice and examine sources of unsound sport nutrition recommendations. Assignments will allow students to gain a greater understanding of the energy requirements of exercise as well as the barriers to increased physical activity. This course consists of two lecture hours.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: (DTC-306) or (NTR-325)

2.0
Electives Choose seven free electives 21
Total 57

Subtotal: 57
Total: 123

Careers

Careers

Researchers and healthcare professionals are increasingly emphasizing the importance of fitness in supporting both physical and mental health. As a result, opportunities for graduates in Exercise & Sports Studies are on the rise. A degree from D'Youville in Exercise & Sports Studies will prepare you to begin a career in any of these settings (and more!):

  • Professional Athletics
  • College/University Strength & Conditioning
  • High School
  • Health & Fitness Industry
  • Personal Training
  • Corporate Fitness
  • Sports Medicine Clinic
  • Exercise Physiology/Research
  • Community Organizations (YMCA, etc..)
  • Military
  • Hospital/Medical Facility
  • Sports Marketing/Promotion/Management
  • Athletic Administration
  • Hospitals/Cardiac Rehabilitation
  • Sports Psychology
  • Sports Sociology
  • Sports Journalism
  • Coaching

As the industry grows, being able to prove your expertise through professional certifications is becoming more important than ever. Students completing the Exercise Studies or Health Professions tracks of the ESS program will be prepared for the credentialing examinations administered by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the National Strength & Conditioning Association (NSCA).

Our multidisciplinary approach prepares you to qualify for these important credentials and prepares you to pursue advanced graduate degrees in a number of fields including exercise physiology or health and human performance.

Internships

Internships

If you're interested in beginning your professional career immediately after graduation, the numerous internship opportunities available to ESS students will allow you to apply what you learn in the classroom into practice through hands-on, real-world experiences. It will provide you with the valuable on-the-job experience employers are looking for while allowing you to investigate a wide range of career experiences and build the kinds of professional contacts that often prove invaluable after graduation.

Because we understand the importance of putting theory into practice, we've structured the ESS program to integrate internship experiences into the curriculum, allowing you to put what you learn in the classroom into practice immediately. This integration allows you to receive an education that emphasizes both academic rigor and practical experience in a supportive environment that recognizes the demands of sports and fitness practitioners. 

D'Youville Athletics

D'Youville's ever-growing NCAA Division-III men's and women's sports teams can provide the basis for learning and internships experiences spanning aspects of the health, fitness, and sports industries. Through experiences with the teams, you'll gain valuable experience in fitness training, sports management, and even coaching, providing you with the real-life experiences that employers are looking for.

Benefits of ESS Internships

Through your internship experiences, you'll:

  • Have the opportunity to explore various employment and career settings in order to discover what's right for your personal and professional goals and interests.
  • Grow your resume through real-world experiences in professional settings.
  • Develop networking skills and professional contacts in the exercise and sports sciences fields.

Admission Requirements

Admission Requirements

At D'Youville, we are committed to selecting students who are academically well-rounded and committed to meeting the challenges of a high-quality education. If you have been successful in a traditional college preparatory program in high school, you should be well-prepared for the academic challenges at D'Youville. While we don't require you to submit ACT or SAT test scores, if you have taken or intend to take a standardized test we encourage you to submit your scores if you'd like them to be evaluated as part of your application.

First Time in College Freshman Requirements:

  • Submitted application for admission
  • Official high school transcripts
    • An overall weighted GPA of 80 with successful completion of high school graduation requirements and three years of math, history, english, and science.

Not Required (utilized in a holistic review for admission if provided):

  • Standardized SAT/ACT test scores
  • Admissions essay
  • Letters of recommendation

Transfer Admission Required Review Criteria:

  • Submitted application for admission
    • Applications are free of charge and can be found on our apply webpage.
  • Official transcripts from ALL previously attended colleges/universities
  • Cumulative GPA of 2

 Not Required (utilized in a holistic review for admission if provided):

  • Coursework relevant to major of interest
  • Admissions essay
  • Letters of recommendation
Daniel Glover

our alumni

"I worked with faculty to create an exercise program for senior citizens that we implemented at several area community centers."

Read Her Story
Dan Glover

Our alumni

"I always had a passion for athletics and fitness and wanted a career in Sports Management."

Read his Story

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